Trends in Suspected Opioid Overdoses from Emergency Departments in 11 States and DC

Description: 

Recent reporting using data from CDC's National Syndromic Surveillance Program indicates that rates of emergency department (ED) visits involving suspected opioid overdoses increased by 70% in the Midwest from the third quarter (Q3) 2016 (July-September) to the Q3 2017. Large increases in the use and distribution of illicitly-manufactured fentanyl (IMF) and fentanyl analogs, are a key factor driving increased opioid overdose rates in the Midwest and east of the Mississippi River. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid 50-“100 times more potent than morphine. A better understanding of the distribution of changes in opioid overdose rate from Q3 2016 to Q3 2017 within states needed to inform response and prevention efforts.

Objective: This presentation will provide insight into how the extensive spread of illicitly-manufactured fentanyl impacted opioid overdose rates throughout the Midwest and neighboring states.

Primary Topic Areas: 
Original Publication Year: 
2019
Event/Publication Date: 
January, 2019

June 18, 2019

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Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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