Travel and Triage: Pilot project to detect infections after medical tourism procedures

EpiCenter, NJ’s statewide syndromic surveillance system, collects ED registration data. The system uses chief complaint data to classify ED visits into syndrome categories and provides alerts to state and local health departments for surveillance anomalies. After the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) started collecting medical notes including triage notes, which contain more specific ED visit information than chief complaint, from 10 EDs to strengthen HAI syndromic surveillance efforts.

January 25, 2018

Enhanced surveillance to monitor response to a provincial overdose emergency, Canada

On April 14, 2016, British Columbia (BC)’s Provincial Health Officer declared a public health emergency due to a significant increase in drug-related overdoses and deaths in the Province. Despite the declaration, 161 suspected drug overdose deaths were reported across the Province in December 2016, a 137% increase over the number of deaths occurring in the same month of 2015. In response to the surge overdoses, Vancouver Coastal Health Authority (VCH), one of 5 health regions within BC, rapidly implemented a number of novel harm reduction initiatives.

January 25, 2018

Evaluation Activities from the National Syndromic Surveillance Program

Syndromic surveillance uses near-real-time Emergency Department healthcare and other data to improve situational awareness and inform activities implemented in response to public health concerns. The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among state and local health departments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), other federal organizations, and other entities, to strengthen the means for and the practice of syndromic surveillance.

January 21, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance for Situation Awareness: Understanding Syndrome Performance

The August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse in Idaho was anticipated to lead to a large influx of visitors in many communities, prompting a widespread effort to assure Idaho was prepared. To support these efforts, the Idaho Syndromic Surveillance program (ISSp) developed a plan to enhance situation awareness during the event by conducting syndromic surveillance using emergency department (ED) visit data contributed to the National Syndromic Surveillance Program’s BioSense platform by Idaho hospitals.

January 21, 2018

Public Health Surveillance for the Great American Solar Eclipse in Oregon

The Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017 provided a rare opportunity to view a complete solar eclipse on the American mainland. Much of Oregon was in the path of totality and forecasted to have clear skies. Ahead of the event, OPHD aggregated a list of 107 known gatherings in mostly rural areas across the state, some with estimated attendance of up to 30,000 attendees. Temporary food vendors and a range of sanitation solutions (including open latrines) were planned. International travelers were expected, along with large numbers of visitors traveling by car on the day of the eclipse.

January 25, 2018

Surveillance for Prevention & Identification of GI Illness Outbreaks Associated with Swimming Pools

Swimming in contaminated pools can cause gastroenteritis from water contaminated by viruses, bacteria, or parasites. Germs that cause gastroenteritis are shed in feces of infected persons, and easily spread to uninfected persons swimming in pools. Symptoms of gastrointestinal illness can include nausea, vomiting, watery or bloody diarrhea, and weight loss. Common causes of swimming-related gastroenteritis included viruses (norovirus), parasites (giardia, cryptosporidium), and bacteria (Escherichia coli, Shigella).

January 25, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance – Reports of Successes from the Field

Syndromic surveillance uses near-real-time emergency department and other health care data for enhancing public health situational awareness and informing public health activities. In recent years, continued progress has been made in developing and strengthening syndromic surveillance activities.

January 21, 2018

Tracking suspected heroin overdoses in CDC's National Syndromic Surveillance Program

Overdose deaths involving opioids (i.e., opioid pain relievers and illicit opioids such as heroin) accounted for at least 63% (N = 33,091) of overdose deaths in 2015. Overdose deaths related to illicit opioids, heroin and illicitly-manufactured fentanyl, have rapidly increased since 2010. For instance, heroin overdose deaths quadrupled from 3,036 in 2010 to 12,989 in 2015. Unfortunately, timely response to emerging trends is inhibited by time lags for national data on both overdose mortality via vital statistics (8-12 months) and morbidity via hospital discharge data (over 2 years).

January 21, 2018

Tracking drug-related overdoses at the local level: Using Syndromic Surveillance in the CO-NCR

The United States is in the midst of a drug crisis; drug-related overdoses are the leading cause of unintentional death in the country. In Colorado the rate of fatal drug overdose increased 68% from 2002-2014 (9.7 deaths per 100,000 to 16.3 per 100,000, respectively), and non-fatal overdose also increased during this time period (23% increase in emergency department visits since 2011).

January 25, 2018

Assessment of the use of ED Chief Complaint Data for monitoring Chronic Diseases

Syndromic Surveillance (SS), traditionally applied to infectious diseases, is more recently being adapted to chronic disease prevention. Its usefulness rests on the large number of diverse individuals visiting emergency rooms with the possibility of real-time monitoring of acute health effects, including effects from environmental events and its potential ability to examine more long-term health effects and trends of chronic diseases on a local level.

Objective:

January 21, 2018

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