Detection of a Salmonellosis Outbreak using Syndromic Surveillance in Georgia

Evidence about the value of syndromic surveillance data for outbreak detection is limited. In July 2018, a salmonellosis outbreak occurred following a family reunion of 300 persons held in Camden County, Georgia, where one meal was served on 7/27/2018 and on 7/28/2018.

Objective: Describe how the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) used data from its State Electronic Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (SendSS) Syndromic Surveillance (SS) module for early detection of an outbreak of salmonellosis in Camden County, Georgia.

June 18, 2019

National Surveillance for Health-Related Workplace Absenteeism, United States 2017-18

During an influenza pandemic, when hospitals and doctors'™ offices are or are perceived to be overwhelmed, many ill people may not seek medical care. People may also avoid medical facilities due to fear of contracting influenza or transmitting it to others. Therefore, syndromic methods for monitoring illness outside of health care settings are important adjuncts to traditional disease reporting. Monitoring absenteeism trends in schools and workplaces provide the archetypal examples for such approaches.

June 18, 2019

Utilizing Syndromic Surveillance for Hurricane Irma-Related CO Poisonings in Florida

On September 10, 2017, Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida. Over 90% of Florida counties reported power outages as of September 11. During power outages, CO poisonings often occur due to indoor use of fuel combustion sources (e.g., cooking, heating) or generators for electricity. CO poisoning is a reportable condition in Florida; health care providers and laboratories are required to report suspected cases to the Florida Department of Health (FDOH). In Florida, approximately 202 cases of CO poisoning are reported each year (three-year average from 2014 to 2016).

June 18, 2019

Disease Surveillance System of Bangladesh: Combating Public Health Emergencies

Disease surveillance is an integral part of public health system. It is an epidemiological method for monitoring disease patterns and trends. International Health Regulation (IHR) 2005 obligates WHO member countries to develop an effective disease surveillance system. Bangladesh is a signatory to IHR 2005. Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research (IEDCR ) is the mandated institute for surveillance and outbreak response on behalf of Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh.

June 18, 2019

Precision public health through clinic-based syndromic surveillance in communities

In December 2009, Taiwan’s CDC stopped its sentinel physician surveillance system. Currently, infectious disease surveillance systems in Taiwan rely on not only the national notifiable disease surveillance system but also real-time outbreak and disease surveillance (RODS) from emergency rooms, and the outpatient and hospitalization surveillance system from National Health Insurance data. However, the timeliness of data exchange and the number of monitored syndromic groups are limited. The spatial resolution of monitoring units is also too coarse, at the city level.

June 18, 2019

Enhancing Drug Overdose Alerts with Spatial Visualization

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana, and the gap continues to widen1. While federal funding opportunities are available for states, it often takes years for best practices to be developed, shared, and published. Similarly, local health departments (LHDs) may experience lengthy delays to receive finalized county health statistics.

June 18, 2019

Real-time monitoring of a mass K2-related overdose outbreak – Connecticut, 2018

On August 15, 2018, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) became aware of a cluster of suspected overdoses in an urban park related to the synthetic cannabinoid K2. Abuse of K2 has been associated with serious adverse effects and overdose clusters have been reported in multiple states. This investigation aimed to characterize the use of syndromic surveillance data to monitor a cluster of suspected overdoses in real time.

June 18, 2019

UPDATED: Syndromic Surveillance 101 - An Introductory Course in Syndromic Surveillance

An Online Training Course

Ever wonder what syndromic surveillance is? How it is applied? This introduction to syndromic surveillance answers your questions and gives you a foundation for understanding how surveillance is used by public health professionals to understand health threats.

 

This video introduces the viewer to the basics of syndromic surveillance and offers a high-level overview of the many uses of this public health tool. Topics covered in this training include:

November 29, 2018

Justification for Collecting Urgent Care Data to Broaden Syndromic Surveillance

While UC does not have a standard definition, it can generally be described as the delivery of ambulatory medical care outside of a hospital emergency department (ED) on a walk-in basis, without a scheduled appointment, available at extended hours, and providing an array of services comparable to typical primary care offices. UC facilities represent a growing sector of the United States healthcare industry, doubling in size between 2008 and 2011. The Urgent Care Association of America (UCAOA) estimates that UC facilities had 160 million patient encounters in 2013.

January 19, 2018

Comparison of National and Local Syndromic Surveillance Data - Cook County, IL, 2017

In 2005, the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) began using the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE) as an emergency department (ED)-based local syndromic surveillance program (LSSP); 23 (100%) of 23 hospitals in suburban Cook County report to the LSSP. Data are transmitted in delimited ASCII text files (i.e., flat files) and contain a unique patient identifier, visit date and time, zip code, age, sex, and chief complaint. Discharge diagnosis and disposition are optional data elements.

January 21, 2018

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