Developing, Evaluating, and Disseminating Definitions for Syndromic Surveillance in Public Health Practice: A Guidance Document

This document, released February 18, 2019, focuses on several key areas related to syndrome definition creation, including the basics behind a syndrome definition, steps to build a syndrome, evaluation of a new (or old) definition, and dissemination.

February 19, 2019

Use of N-grams and Term Relationship Graphs in the Syndrome Definition Development Process

The use of syndromic surveillance systems has evolved over the last decade, and increasingly includes both infectious and non- infectious topic areas. Public health agencies at the national, state, and local levels often need to rapidly develop new syndromic categories, or improve upon existing categories, to enhance their public health surveillance efforts. Documenting this development process can help support increased understanding and user acceptance of syndromic surveillance.

June 18, 2019

Syndrome definitions for drug overdose: How far down the rabbit hole do we go?

State and local jurisdictions have been exploring the use of SyS data to monitor suspected drug overdose outbreaks in their communities. With the increasing awareness and use of SyS systems, staff from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) worked to develop several queries that jurisdictions could use to better capture suspected drug overdose visits. In 2017, CDC released their first two queries on heroin overdose and opioid overdose, followed in 2018 by stimulant and all drug overdose queries.

June 18, 2019

Using Syndromic Surveillance Data to Study the Impact of Media Content on Self-harm

In 2016, a half million people were treated in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) as a result of self-harm. 1 Not only is self-harm a major cause of morbidity in the U.S., but it is also one of the best predictors of suicide. Given that approximately 40% of suicide decedents visited an ED in the year prior to their death and that the majority of medically-serious self-harm patients are treated in EDs2, EDs serve as a critical setting in which to monitor rates and trends of suicidal behavior.

June 18, 2019

Syndrome Development to Assess IDU, HIV, and Homelessness in MA Emergency Departments

In Massachusetts, syndromic surveillance (SyS) data have been used to monitor injection drug use and acute opioid overdoses within EDs. Currently, Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) SyS captures over 90% of ED visits statewide. These real-time data contain rich free-text and coded clinical and demographic information used to categorize visits for population level public health surveillance. Other surveillance data have shown elevated rates of opioid overdose related ED visits, Emergency Medical Service incidents, and fatalities in Massachusetts from 2014-20171,2,3.

June 18, 2019

Validating Syndromic Data for Opioid Overdose Surveillance in Florida

In 2017, FL Department of Health (DOH) became one of thirty-two states plus Washington, D.C funded by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) under the ESOOS program. One of the objectives of this funding was to increase the timeliness of reporting on non-fatal opioid overdoses through syndromic surveillance utilizing either the emergency department (ED) or Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data systems. Syndromic case validation is an essential requirement under ESOOS for non-fatal opioid-involved overdose (OIOD).

June 18, 2019

Syndrome Definition Committee (SDC)

MISSION

The mission of the Syndrome Definition Committee (SDC) is to create, evaluate, and refine syndrome definitions, link users with similar syndrome definition needs, and create documentation along the way. We seek to be a resource for collaboration and best practices in the syndrome definition creation process.

RESOURCES

Meetings will occur the first Wednesday of each month from 1-2 PM EST

November 30, 2018

Enhancing Respiratory Infection Surveillance on the US/Mexico Border- Arizona BIDS Program Sentinel Surveillance Data

This project was established through the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) program in Arizona (AZ) to monitor infecting respiratory pathogens among hospitalized patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI) in the AZ border region from September 2010 to the present.

Objective

To present the epidemiology, clinical aspects, and laboratory results of AZ SARI case patients and to describe respiratory viruses in the AZ border region.

August 22, 2018

Tuning a Chief Complaint Text Parser for Use in DoD ESSENCE

An expanded ambulatory health record, the Comprehensive Ambulatory Patient Encounter Record (CAPER) will provide multiple types of data for use in DoD ESSENCE. A new type of data not previously available is the Reason for Visit (ROV), a free-text field analogous to the Chief Complaint (CC). Intake personnel ask patients why they have come to the clinic and record their responses. Traditionally, the text should reflect the patient's actual statement. In reality the staff often "translates" the statement and adds jargon. Text parsing maps key words or phrases to specific syndromes.

May 02, 2019

Applications of Syndromic Surveillance in Resource Poor Settings: A Series of Case Studies

Particularly in resource-poor settings, syndromic surveillance has been proposed as a feasible solution to the challenges in meeting the new disease surveillance requirements included in the World Health Organization's International Health Regulations (2005).

Objective

The aim of this study is to demonstrate how syndromic surveillance systems are working in low-resource settings while identifying the key best practices and considerations.

May 02, 2019

Pages

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

This website is supported by Cooperative Agreement # 6NU38OT000297-02-01 Strengthening Public Health Systems and Services through National Partnerships to Improve and Protect the Nation's Health between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on private websites.

Site created by Fusani Applications