PHIN-MS deployment acceptability survey for the data transfer of syndromic data between hospitals and public health

PHIN-MS can send and receive data securely and automatically. It is used by many hospitals in the state(s) to send data to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC) for both our National Electronic Disease Surveillance System and our South Carolina Early Aberration Alerting Network syndromic surveillance system.

Objective

June 25, 2019

Performance of machine learning method to classify free-text medical causes of death

Mortality is an indicator of the severity of the impact of an event on the population. In France mortality surveillance is part of the syndromic surveillance system SurSaUD and is carried out by Santé publique France, the French public health agency. The set-up of an Electronic Death Registration System (EDRS) in 2007 enabled to receive in real-time medical causes of death in free-text format. This data source was considered as reactive and valuable to implement a reactive mortality surveillance system using medical causes of death (1).

June 18, 2019

Evaluation of First Electronic Case Reports received in Illinois

Communicable disease reporting from providers can be a time-consuming process that results in delayed or incomplete reporting of infectious diseases, limiting public health's ability to respond quickly to prevent or control disease. The recent development of an HL7 standard for automated Electronic initial case reports (eICR) represents an important advancement for public health surveillance.

June 18, 2019

Evaluation of Animal Rabies Surveillance System, Ekiti State, Nigeria, 2012-2017

Rabies is a zoonotic, neglected viral disease. Every 10 minutes, the world loses a life, especially children, to dog-mediated rabies. Yet it is 100% preventable. Africa, including Nigeria, has major share of the disease. Eradication of human rabies relies majorly on control of rabies in animals and this cannot be achieved without good surveillance system of the disease in animal, especially dogs. There is little or no information as to whether the surveillance system in Nigeria is effective.

June 18, 2019

Using Evaluation to Inform the BioSense Platform: Results from a 2018 Survey

Since 2015, CDC’s Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance staff have conducted evaluations to provide information on the utility, functionality, usability and user satisfaction associated with the National Syndromic Surveillance Program’s BioSense Platform tools.

June 18, 2019

User Generated SQL Queries Inform Evaluation of NSSP ESSENCE

As system users develop queries within ESSENCE, they step through the user-interface to select data sources and parameters needed for their query. Then they select from the available output options (e.g., time series, table builder, data details). These activities execute a SQL query on the database, the majority of which are saved in a log so that system developers can troubleshoot problems. Secondarily, these data can be used as a form of web analytics to describe user query choices, query volume, query execution time, and develop an understanding of ESSENCE query patterns.

January 25, 2018

Evaluation of an arboviral syndrome query used in Maricopa County, Arizona

Timely identification of arboviral disease is key to prevent transmission in the community, but traditional surveillance may take up to 14 days between specimen collection and health department notification. Arizona state and county health agencies began monitoring National Syndromic Surveillance Program BioSense 2.0 data for patients infected with West Nile virus (WNV), St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), chikungunya, or dengue virus in August 2015. Zika virus was added in April 2016.

January 19, 2018

Evaluation Activities from the National Syndromic Surveillance Program

Syndromic surveillance uses near-real-time Emergency Department healthcare and other data to improve situational awareness and inform activities implemented in response to public health concerns. The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among state and local health departments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), other federal organizations, and other entities, to strengthen the means for and the practice of syndromic surveillance.

January 21, 2018

Impact of the NSSP’s transition to ESSENCE on chief complaint field-based syndromes

In January 2017, the NSSP transitioned their BioSense analytical tools to Electronic Surveillance System for Early Notification of Community-Based Epidemics (ESSENCE). The chief complaint field in BioSense 2.0 was a concatenation of the record's chief complaint, admission reason, triage notes, and diagnostic impression. Following the transition to ESSENCE, the chief complaint field was comprised of the first chief complaint entered or the first admission reason, if the chief complaint was blank.

January 21, 2018

Comparison of National and Local Syndromic Surveillance Data - Cook County, IL, 2017

In 2005, the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) began using the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE) as an emergency department (ED)-based local syndromic surveillance program (LSSP); 23 (100%) of 23 hospitals in suburban Cook County report to the LSSP. Data are transmitted in delimited ASCII text files (i.e., flat files) and contain a unique patient identifier, visit date and time, zip code, age, sex, and chief complaint. Discharge diagnosis and disposition are optional data elements.

January 21, 2018

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