A Tool for Promoting Responsible Antibiotic Prescribing across Settings and Sectors

Antibiotic resistance is a mounting public health threat calling for action on global, national and local levels. Antibiotic use has been a major driver of increasing rates of antibiotic resistance. This has given rise to the practice of antibiotic stewardship, which seeks to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use across different care settings. Antibiotic stewardship has been increasingly applied in hospital settings, but adoption has been slow in many ambulatory care settings including primary care of humans. Uptake of antibiotic stewardship in veterinary care has been similarly limited.

June 18, 2019

Tracking harmful chemicals and pathogens using the Human Health Observatory at ASU

Sewerage systems of villages, townships, cities and megacities convey the urine, stool, blood, and sputum of community members, enabling through analysis of community wastewater, a near real-time assessment of population health status and of emerging public health threats. Signature compounds and biomarkers targeted analytically for surveillance may include chemical and biological threat agents, transformation products of the same, human metabolites, biomarkers of exposure and other markers of interest.

June 18, 2019

Antibiotic Resistance Investment Map

The AR Investment Map showcases the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention's (CDC) activities to meet national goals to prevent drug-resistant infections. CDC’s AR Solutions Initiative puts state and local AR laboratory and epidemiological expertise in every state and makes investments in public health innovation to fight AR across healthcare settings, food, and communities.

March 29, 2018

Carbapenem Resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections in Houston, Texas: An outline

According to CDC, CRE is used to describe bacteria that are nonsusceptible to one or more carbapenems; doripenem, meropenem or imipenem and resistant to third generation cephalosporins like ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and ceftazidime. These organisms cause infections that are associated with high mortality rates and they have the potential to spread widely. Antibiotic resistant bacteria cause more than 2 million illnesses and at least 23,000 deaths each year in United States.

December 15, 2016

Carbapenem Resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections in Houston, Texas: An outline

According to CDC, CRE is used to describe bacteria that are non- susceptible to one or more carbapenems; doripenem, meropenem or imipenem and resistant to third generation cephalosporins like ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and ceftazidime. These organisms cause infections that are associated with high mortality rates and they have the potential to spread widely. Antibiotic resistant bacteria cause more than 2 million illnesses and at least 23,000 deaths each year in United States.

July 11, 2017

First report on MRSA recovered from wild boars in the north of Portugal

Antibiotic resistance is an emerging public health concern and the scientific community recognizes the need to evaluate its epidemiology. Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a key to this problem. Often found in the natural flora of the skin, nose and mouth of humans and animals, these bacteria can cause both minor skin infections and serious diseases that can result in death. Apart from the hospital concern, this bacterium is becoming increasingly common in infections associated to both human and animal communities with high rates of antibiotic resistance.

September 28, 2017

The Big Picture: Using Antibiotic Use and Surveillance Data to Better Inform Stewardship in Healthcare Settings

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that antibiotic-resistant infections affect 2 million people and cause 23,000 deaths annually in the United States. It is well documented that the primary driver of antibiotic resistance is the use of antibiotics, whether appropriate or inappropriate. The more that is known about how antibiotics are used in all healthcare settings, the more effective stewardship efforts can be to improve how antibiotics are used.

March 14, 2017

Predicting Facility-Level Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) Incidence Based on Social Network Measures

CRE are multidrug-resistant bacteria associated with up to 50 percent mortality in infected persons. CRE are increasingly problematic in Illinois healthcare facilities, especially long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs); therefore, Illinois implemented the eXtensively Drug-Resistant Organism (XDRO) registry (www.xdro. org). Mathematical models have identified patient sharing between healthcare facilities as a mechanism for regional spread, and the importance of each facility within a network can be quantified using social network analysis.

September 07, 2017

Susceptibility Profile of Drug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Based on ELR

Since November 2014, the Houston Health Department has been receiving antimicrobial resistance information for Streptococcus pneumoniae from a safety net hospital via electronic laboratory reporting (ELR). Antimicrobial characteristics and vaccination rates of pneumococcal disease are of public health interest due to potential implications in treatment and prevention. Ten states participate in the CDC’s Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) program. Texas, which represents a different and diverse demographic compared to other states, is not an ABCs participating state.

September 19, 2017

Metagenomic Profiling and Identification of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes from Airborne Microbial Communities

Since the adoption of antibiotics in the early 20th century, a plethora of clinical pathogens have acquired resistance to one or more modern-day antibiotics. This has resulted in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) being recognized as a severe threat to human and animal health worldwide. Recent work has demonstrated that AMR bacteria are widely prevalent in the environment, perhaps exacerbated by the widespread use of antibiotics for clinical or agricultural purposes.

Objective

November 02, 2017

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