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Traditionally, public health surveillance departments collect, analyze, interpret, and package information into static surveillance reports for distribution to stakeholders. This resource-intensive production and dissemination process has major shortcomings that impede end users from optimally... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The motivation for this project is to provide greater situational awareness to DoD epidemiologists monitoring the health of military personnel and their dependents. An increasing number of data sources of varying clinical specificity and timeliness are available to the staff. The challenge is to... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Public Health England (PHE) uses syndromic surveillance systems to monitor for seasonal increases in respiratory illness. Respiratory illnesses create a considerable burden on health care services and therefore identifying the timing and intensity of peaks of activity is important for public... Read more

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The early detection of outbreaks of diseases is one of the most challenging objectives of epidemiological surveillance systems. In order to achieve this goal, the primary foundation is using those big surveillance data for understanding and controlling the spatiotemporal variability of disease... Read more

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The primary goal of syndromic surveillance is early recognition of disease trends, in order to identify and control infectious disease outbreaks, such as influenza. For surveillance of influenza-like illness (ILI), public health departments receive data from multiple sources with varying degrees... Read more

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Traditional infectious disease epidemiology is built on the foundation of high quality and high accuracy data on disease and behavior. Digital infectious disease epidemiology, on the other hand, uses existing digital traces, re-purposing them to identify patterns in health-related processes.... Read more

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Traditional influenza surveillance relies on reports of influenzalike illness (ILI) by healthcare providers, capturing individuals who seek medical care and missing those who may search, post, and tweet about their illnesses instead. Existing research has shown some promise of using data from... Read more

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The North Dakota Department of Health (NDDoH) collects outpatient ILI data through North Dakota Influenza-like Illness Network (ND ILINet), providing situational awareness regarding the percent of visits for ILI at sentinel sites across the state. Because of increased clinic staff time devoted... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Standard syndrome definitions for ED visits in ESSENCE rely on chief complaints. Visits with more words in the chief complaint field are more likely to match syndrome definitions. While using ESSENCE, we observed geographic differences in chief complaint length, apparently related to differences... Read more

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The use of social media as a syndromic sentinel for diseases is an emerging field of growing relevance as the public begins to share more online, particularly in the area of influenza. Several applications have been developed to predict or monitor influenza activity using publicly posted or self... Read more

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