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Timely and accurate measurement of overdose morbidity using emergency department (ED) data is necessary to inform an effective public health response given the dynamic nature of opioid overdose epidemic in the United States. However, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, differing sources and types... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Black Hoosiers, the largest minority population in Indiana, make up almost 10% of the state's population, and accounted for 8% of the total resident drug overdose deaths from 2013-2017 compared to whites at 91%. However, a closer look at race-specific mortality rates might reveal racial... Read more

Content type: Abstract

As a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) funded state, Kentucky started utilizing Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data to increase timeliness of state data on drug overdose events in late 2016. Using developed definitions of heroin... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The opioid epidemic is a multifaceted public health issue that requires a coordinated and dynamic response to address the ongoing changes in the trends of opioid overdoses. Access to timely and accurate data allows more targeted and effective programs and policies to prevent and reduce fatal and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana, and the gap continues to widen1. While federal funding opportunities are available for states, it often takes years for best practices to be developed, shared, and published. Similarly, local... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Accuracy in identifying drug-related emergency department admissions is critical to understanding local burden of disease and assessing effectiveness of drug abuse prevention and overdose-reduction initiatives. In 2018 the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) began implementation of a... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana and the gap continues to widen1. As the opioid crisis rages on in the United States the federal government is providing funding opportunities to states, but it often takes years for best... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Drug overdose mortality is a growing problem in the United States. In 2017 alone over 72,000 deaths were attributed to drug overdose, most of which were caused by fentanyl and fentanyl analogs (synthetic opioids). While nearly every community has seen an increase in drug overdose, there is... Read more

Content type: Abstract

On April 14, 2016, British Columbia (BC)’s Provincial Health Officer declared a public health emergency due to a significant increase in drug-related overdoses and deaths in the Province. Despite the declaration, 161 suspected drug overdose deaths were reported across the Province in December... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2017, 951 Missouri residents died from an opioid overdose, a record number for the state.1 This continues the trend from 2016, which saw an increase of over 30% in opioid overdose deaths compared to 2015. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (MDHSS) manages several public... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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