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Cryptosporidiosis is a diarrheal disease caused by microscopic parasite Cryptosporidium. Modes of transmission include eating undercooked food contaminated with the parasite, swallowing something that has come into contact with human or animal feces, or swallowing pool water contaminated with... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Different studies have shown that Streptococcal infections in adults are more common among older age, blacks, and underlying chronic medical conditions like diabetes, cardiovascular and kidney diseases. In specific, other studies have demonstrated that streptococcal pyogenes can cause severe... Read more

Content type: Abstract

West Nile virus (WNV) is considered the leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease and is spread through mosquitoes. In general, the majority of the cases are asymptomatic. One in five people infected will display mild symptoms like fever, headache, body ache, nausea, and vomiting... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Legionellosis is a respiratory illness that is mostly (80-90%) caused by the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. It is associated with a mild febrile illness, Pontiac fever, or Legionnaires'™ disease (1), a source of severe, community-acquired pneumonia. Legionella bacteria mostly affect elderly... Read more

Content type: Abstract

According to CDC, CRE is used to describe bacteria that are non- susceptible to one or more carbapenems; doripenem, meropenem or imipenem and resistant to third generation cephalosporins like ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and ceftazidime. These organisms cause infections that are associated with high... Read more

Content type: Abstract

According to CDC, CRE is used to describe bacteria that are nonsusceptible to one or more carbapenems; doripenem, meropenem or imipenem and resistant to third generation cephalosporins like ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and ceftazidime. These organisms cause infections that are associated with high... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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