Tracking environmental hazards and health outcomes to inform decision-making in the United States

In 2002, the United States (US) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) to address the challenges in environmental health surveillance described by the Pew Environmental Commission (1). The report cited gaps in our understanding of how the environment affects our health and attributed these gaps to a dearth of surveillance data for environmental hazards, human exposures, and health effects.

June 18, 2019

Improving Public Health Surveillance methods via Smart Home technologies

Public health surveillance relies on surveys and/or self-reported data collection, both of which require manpower, time commitment, and financial resources from public health agencies and participants. The survey results can quickly become outdated due to fast-paced changes in our society. The health habits of Canadians have rapidly evolved with technology and research indicates we are becoming a sedentary society, thus the levels of physical activity (PA) are very important population level health indicators.

June 18, 2019

Leptospirosis, Climate and Satellite-based Environmental Factors: A Temporal Modeling

Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the pathogenic Leptospira bacteria and is ubiquitously distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Leptospirosis transmission driven by complex factors include climatic, environmental and local social conditions [1]. Each year, there are about 1 million cases of human leptospirosis reported globally and it causes approximately 60,000 people lost their lives due to infection [2].

June 18, 2019

Effect of climate on Enteric Fever incidence in Ahmedabad, India

Enteric fever (EF) is a grave systemic infection, which has been controlled quite effectively in developed countries, but continues to be a grave public health concern for India. Environmental drivers such as rainfall, temperature, relative humidity and El Niño-Southern Oscillations (ENSO) are known to influence the transmission of Salmonella typhi and paratyphi. India possesses the largest population burden of EF, yet very few studies have explored its climatic associations.

June 18, 2019

Using syndromic surveillance to monitor response to cyanotoxin contamination event

Cyanotoxins are unregulated, emerging contaminants that have been associated with adverse health effects, including gastroenteritis, when consumed at high levels1,2. In May and June of 2018 cyanotoxins were detected in the public drinking water system for Salem, OR at levels above Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) health advisory levels for sensitive groups3. Sensitive groups were defined as children under 6, elderly adults, pregnant women, nursing mothers, people with compromised immune systems, people receiving dialysis, people with pre-existing liver conditions, and pets.

June 18, 2019

Poison center data for public health surveillance: Poison center and public health perspectives

Since 2008, poisoning is the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States; since 1980, the poisoning-related fatality rate in the United States (U.S.) has almost tripled. Many poison-related injuries and deaths are reported to regional PCs which receive about 2.4 million reports of human chemical and poison exposures annually. Federal, state, and local PH agencies often collaborate with PCs and use PC data for PH surveillance to identify poisoning-related health issues.

January 21, 2018

Using real-time syndromic surveillance to monitor the health effects of air pollution

The negative effect of air pollution on human health is well documented illustrating increased risk of respiratory, cardiac and other health conditions. Currently, during air pollution episodes Public Health England (PHE) syndromic surveillance systems provide a near real-time analysis of the health impact of poor air quality.

January 21, 2018

Malaria risk assessment through Remote Sensing and MultiCriteria Evaluation in Madagascar

Malaria remains a major public health problem in Madagascar. Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) is the adopted strategy for malaria control in the CHs and Fringe regions of Madagascar. Remotely sensed data analysis combined with Multi-Criteria Evaluation become crucial to target priority areas for intervention.

Objective:

Madagascar is one of the low-income countries with limited resources. In order to minimize the cost of the fight against malaria, the main objective of this study is to identify the priority zone for Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS).

January 25, 2018

Extreme Weather Surveillance

Problem Summary

October 30, 2017

Pages

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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