Turning the Tide on the Opioid Epidemic

Presenters

Susan Robinson, Vaccine-Preventable Disease Epidemiologist, Arizona Department of Health Services

Erica Weis, Injury Prevention Epidemiologist, Arizona Department of Health Services

Background

March 27, 2019

Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) Program Overview

These slides were presented at the Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) Program Overview Partner meeting, led by CDC and organized by ASTHO in March of 2019. 

Presenters

Puja Seth, PhD – Lead, Epidemiology and Surveillance

Alana Vivolo-Kantor, PhD – Morbidity Lead

Christine L. Mattson, PhD – Mortality Lead

Objectives

March 27, 2019

Recommendations for Surveillance of EMS Data for Opioid Overdoses

Presented March 21, 2019.

FirstWatch Recommendations for Surveillance of EMS Data for Opioid Overdoses: https://www.firstwatch.net/finding-opioid-data/

March 29, 2019

Enhancing Drug Overdose Alerts with Spatial Visualization

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana, and the gap continues to widen1. While federal funding opportunities are available for states, it often takes years for best practices to be developed, shared, and published. Similarly, local health departments (LHDs) may experience lengthy delays to receive finalized county health statistics.

June 18, 2019

Monitoring Heat-Related Illness through Syndromic Surveillance in Los Angeles County

LAC experienced several days of record-breaking temperatures during the summer of 2018. Downtown Los Angeles temperatures soared to 108°F in July with an average daily maximum of 92°F. Extreme heat events such as these can pose major risks to human health. Syndromic surveillance can be a useful tool in providing near real-time surveillance of HRI. In 2014, a working group was formed within the CSTE Climate Change Subcommittee to define and analyze HRI.

June 18, 2019

Using Syndromic Surveillance Data to Study the Impact of Media Content on Self-harm

In 2016, a half million people were treated in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) as a result of self-harm. 1 Not only is self-harm a major cause of morbidity in the U.S., but it is also one of the best predictors of suicide. Given that approximately 40% of suicide decedents visited an ED in the year prior to their death and that the majority of medically-serious self-harm patients are treated in EDs2, EDs serve as a critical setting in which to monitor rates and trends of suicidal behavior.

June 18, 2019

Enhancing TX SyS by integrating EMS and Poison Data for Opioid Overdose Surveillance

In recent years, the number of deaths from illicit and prescription opioids has increased significantly resulting in a national and local public health crisis. According to the Texas Center for Health Statistics, there were 1340 opioid related deaths in 2015.1 In 2005, by comparison, there were 913 opioid related deaths. Syndromic surveillance can be used to monitor overdose trends in near real-time and provide much needed information to public health officials.

June 18, 2019

Monitoring Sexual Violence Visits in Emergency Department Data to Improve Public Health

Although sexual violence is a pressing public health and safety issue, it has historically been challenging to monitor population trends with precision. Approximately 31% of incidents of sexual violence are reported to law enforcement and only 5% lead to an arrest1, making the use of law enforcement data challenging. Syndromic surveillance data from emergency departments provides an opportunity to use care-seeking to more accurately surveil sexual violence without introducing additional burdens on either patients or healthcare providers.

June 18, 2019

Using Syndromic Surveillance to Quantify ED Visits for Coagulopathy Cases

In March 2018, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) was informed of a cluster of coagulopathy cases linked to SC use. By June 30, 2018, 172 cases were reported, including five deaths, where 74% were male and the mean age was 35.3 years (range: 18–65 years). All cases presented to an emergency department (ED) at least once for this illness. Ninety-four cases provided clinical specimens and all tested positive for brodifacoum, a long-acting anticoagulant used in rodenticide.

June 18, 2019

21st Century Approach: Using data and novel technologies to address the opioid crisis

Clark County, Indiana is geographically located in between the urban area of Louisville, Kentucky and Scott County, Indiana. Scott County is the site for the largest HIV outbreak in the history of the United States, directly related to high rates of IV drug abuse. The unique geographic location of Clark County in combination with the recent HIV and Hepatitis C outbreaks in Clark and neighboring counties has greatly informed the development of an effective response to overdoses and the opioid epidemic in general.

June 18, 2019

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