Using Syndromic Surveillance Data to Aid Public Health Actions in Tennessee

Syndromic surveillance data is typically used for the monitoring of symptom combinations in patient chief complaints (i.e. syndromes) or health indicators within a population to inform public health actions. The Tennessee Department of Health collects emergency department (ED) data from more than 80 hospitals across Tennessee to support statewide situational awareness. Most hospitals in Tennessee provide data within 48 hours of the patient being seen in the emergency department.

June 18, 2019

Monitoring Out-of-State Patients during a 2017 Hurricane Response using ESSENCE

Syndromic surveillance is the monitoring of symptom combinations (i.e., syndromes) or other indicators within a population to inform public health actions. The Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) collects emergency department (ED) data from more than 70 hospitals across Tennessee to support statewide syndromic surveillance activities. Hospitals in Tennessee typically provide data within 48 hours of a patient encounter.

January 19, 2018

Creation of a Technical Tool to Improve Syndromic Surveillance Onboarding in Tennessee

Syndromic surveillance is commonly supported by information generated from electronic health record (EHR) systems and sent to public health via standardized messaging. Before public health can receive syndromic surveillance information from an EHR, a healthcare provider must demonstrate reliable and timely generation of messages according to national standards. This process is known as onboarding. Onboarding at the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) focused heavily on human review of HL7 messages.

January 25, 2018

Leveraging Public Health Emergency Informatics during the Fungal Infections Outbreak, Tennessee - 2012

Late in September 2012, the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) identified a cluster of fungal infections following epidural injection of methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) from a single compounding pharmacy. This presented a public health imperative to contact, educate and monitor approximately 1,100 Tennessee residents who received injections from contaminated MPA lots that were shipped to three clinics in Tennessee. There was no precedent to accomplish this rapidly and efficiently.

April 28, 2019

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NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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