Opioid Seizures by Law Enforcement in Relation to Emergency Room Visits

In 2016, there were approximately 63,000 deaths nationally due to drug overdose. This trend continues to increase with the provisional number of US deaths for 2017 being approximately 72,000 (1). This increase in overdose deaths is fueled largely by the opioid class of drugs. The opioid epidemic began in the 1990s with a steady rise in prescription opioid overdoses. However, after 2010 a rise in heroin overdose deaths also began to occur.

June 18, 2019

Finding Chances to Intervene Before the Fatal Overdose: Linking ED and Mortality Data

In 2017, 951 Missouri residents died from an opioid overdose, a record number for the state.1 This continues the trend from 2016, which saw an increase of over 30% in opioid overdose deaths compared to 2015. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (MDHSS) manages several public health surveillance data sources that can be used to inform about the opioid epidemic. Opioid overdose deaths are identified through death certificates which are collected through the vital records system.

June 18, 2019

Tracking Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome in Missouri: Trends and the ICD-CM Transition

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) rates have tripled for Missouri residents in the past three years. NAS is a condition infants suffer soon after birth due to withdrawal after becoming opioid-dependent in the womb. NAS has significant immediate health concerns and can have long term effects on child development and quality of life.

January 21, 2018

Opioid Misuse in Missouri: Analyzing Emergency Department Use in Urban/Rural Areas

Like many other states in the U.S., Missouri has experienced large increases in opioid abuse resulting in hundreds dying each year and thousands of ED visits due to overdose. Missouri has two major urban areas, St. Louis and Kansas City and a few smaller cities, while the remainder of the state is more rural in nature. The opioid epidemic has impacted all areas in the state but the magnitude of that impact varies as well as the type of opioid used.

January 21, 2018

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